Common Questions

Q.    WHAT IS STAFF/CHILD RATIO AND WHAT EXACTLY DOES THAT MEAN?

A.    The staff/child ratio numerically represents the number of staff per the number of children throughout the day in that particular program.  Generally the lower the ratio, the higher the quality of care and education.  The children simply get more attention.  Consequently, when comparing infant care & preschool programs, ratios are an excellent indicator of overall quality!

Q.    HOW CAN I HELP MAKE THIS TRANSITION TO CHILD CARE A SMOOTH ONE?

A.    Depending on the age of your child and his/her ability to comprehend, we suggest the following:

Try to bring your child in for short visits prior to regular attendance. ALWAYS  remind your child that you WILL be back after work for pick up. Explain how big people go to work and little people go to school. Establish and maintain a drop off routine -- CONSISTENCY IS VITAL!  Shorter drop-offs usually are more effective. Try to maintain, as best you can, the same daily attendance hours: this is of particular importance during the first few weeks. Remain positive about new arrangements, even if your child tells you he/she is not happy yet...typically there is an adjustment period that may range up to several weeks. Tell the Teacher and/or Director of any concerns you or your child are experiencing; we are sure we can help IF we know the problem!  

Q.    WILL MY CHILD BE FORCED TO TAKE A NAP EACH DAY?

A.    Absolutely not.  Although we find that virtually all of the children do indeed take a nap, a few have been known to resist.  We simply explain that each child must spend some quiet time on his/her mat during naptime with a book or puzzle while the others sleep.  Also, please do not make the mistake of believing an afternoon nap is a substitute for a long period of uninterrupted overnight sleep.  The lack of this type of prolonged sleep cannot be "made up" the next day.  Insufficient sleep in children can result in irritability, an inability to concentrate and generally slower development.  This is, perhaps aside from diet, the single most important aspect of child development in which parents have direct daily influence.

Q.    WILL MY CHILD BE UPSET WITH ME FOR DROPPING HIM/HER OFF AT SCHOOL?

A.    Younger children and older children with no preschool experience seem to have a longer adjustment period.  Some crying and/or "I don't want to go" chants are quite common.  You can help by remaining calm and consistent in your resolve about school.  NEVER apologize to your child for bringing him/her to school, no matter how upset he/she may appear.  "Mommy is sorry, I'll be back as soon as I can" simply sends the wrong message.  You will give the impression that school is not where you believe your child should be.  Also, saying you're sorry implies guilt on your part.  That message only makes the adjustment period more difficult.  Always remain positive and upbeat!  Try, "you will have fun with your friends and I'll pick you up after work."

Q.    IS IT TRUE THAT CHILDREN IN DAY CARE GET SICK MORE OFTEN THAN THOSE AT HOME?

A.    This answer depends greatly on how much time your child has spent in a child care environment.  A study conducted by the Center for Disease Control found that children ages three to five who had been in day care actually had a lower rate of colds and respiratory infections than those not exposed to day care.  They concluded that prolonged exposure to day care leads to a build up of immunities to common childhood ailments.  Our experience here at Corporate Toddlers confirms the above.  The frequency of illness is greater in our infant & toddler programs and is dramatically lower in our programs for the older children.

Q.    WHEN WILL MY CHILD MOVE FROM ONE PROGRAM TO ANOTHER PROGRAM?

A.    There are several distinct developmental goals established for each program.  Children advance from one program to the next based upon their own pace towards achieving those goals.  Every move is made on a trial basis.  We never want your child to be overmatched or underchallenged.